Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Strange Eons: Classes and Skills

Many of the classes originally presented in the Players Handbook are perfectly appropriate, though there will be some changes. I personally like the Generic Classes approach to D20 games, as it allows personal versatility, and for a more individualistic character selection.
In the shattered remnants of a once mighty people, mankind has been brought back to the basics of survival, though with constant reminders of what has been lost all around him.
STRANGE EONS CLASSES


Below are the PHB player character classes of the Strange Eons setting:

Barbarian:
No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. As the worlds have plunged into untamed and often alien savagery, man has needed to learn to fight hard to survive. In such a world, the barbarian often reigns supreme.
Bard: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. Aristocratic magicians of no small reputation, bards are considered to be the only "good" spellcasters by the common folk of Strange Eons. Many bards can be found operating as cult leaders and advisors as well as adventurers.
Cleric: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. Though all Clerics will either follow Planetary Cults, Machine Cults, or Xenogen (alien) demon cults. See Strange Eons Religion for more details.
Druid: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. Same as Clerics, though without large religious structures. These spellcasters tend to only be found in the most remote of locales.
Fighter: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. This is the most common PC class for a Strange Eons campaign.
Monk: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. Monks are often religious leaders of various cults and philosophies. Cults dedicated to powerful wizards often sport many monk orders, acting as "witch hunters" sent out to cut down on the number of up-and-coming wizards.
Paladin: Inappropriate to a Strange Eons campaign. The gods of the Strange Eons setting are either more force than person, amoral or terribly evil, this class doent fit well.
Ranger: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. Rangers exist along all of the fringes. Undead hunting rangers are common in the many half-ruined cities.

Rogue: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. This would also be a common PC class in Strange Eons.
Sorcerer: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. These peasant sorcerers are the most commonly encountered practitioners of the higher magics, though often ignorant of its deeper principles. Many sorcerers were granted their powers from the bizarre processes of the Xenogen aliens.
Wizard: No changes necessary in a Strange Eons campaign. The top magical power in the setting and thus the most feared of creatures. The most powerful wizards are ancient beings some of whom remember earlier ages of mans might.
Prestige Classes

Forester: Wilderness warriors that seek to maintain the natural order, and eliminate unnatural creatures. Replace the Requirements as follows:
Base Attack Bonus: +4.
Skills: Wilderness Lore 9 ranks, Knowledge (nature) 5 ranks.
Feats: Ambidexterity, Track.
Special: Must have been accepted and trained by Gardener Robotic Constructs or another Forester.

Gypsy: Traveling mystics and diviners, gypsy's can be found on any world.

Serpent Archer: Worshipers of serpents and serpent monsters, these mystics are greatly feared. Most often found on the world Tethys, where they are known as Ufions Children.
Scorpion Scion: Worshipers of poisonous vermin, these mystics are greatly feared. Most often found on the world Tethys and are most active at night.

Knowledge (Technology) (Int)
You can make a Knowledge (technology) check to correctly identify airships as well as identify unfamiliar technological devices.
Check: The DCs for identifying technological items vary depending on the type of information required:
  • Identifying an airship by its type: DC 10.
  • Determining the function or purpose of a particular mechanical system: DC 15.
  • Determining the function or purpose of a particular mechanical or electrical system: DC 15.
  • Recalling the standard, factory-model design specs of a particular type or class of airship: DC 20.
When confronted with an unfamiliar piece of technology or artifact, you can make a Knowledge (technology) check to correctly surmise the primary (if not singular) purpose of the device. A successful check result does not enable you to activate the item, nor does it make you proficient with the item. The DC of the Knowledge (technology) check depends on the item being identified:
Unfamiliar Item
DC
Basic tool or instrument
10
Vehicular component
15
Airship component
20
Ancient weapon or biotechnology
25
Pilot (Dex)
You can use the Pilot skill to fly any kind of airship.

Check: Unless you have the appropriate Airship Operation feat, you take a −4 penalty on Pilot checks made to pilot an airship.
Repair (Int)
You can use this skill to repair machines.

Check: Repairing damage to a device or construct takes 1 hour of work, a mechanical tool kit and a proper facility such as a workshop or hangar bay. (Without a tool kit, you take a −4 penalty on your Repair check.) At the end of the hour, make a Repair check (DC 20). Success repairs 2d6 points of damage. If damage remains, you may continue to make repairs for as many hours as it takes to restore the vehicle to full hit points.
Special: A construct, device or vehicle that is reduced to 0 hp cannot be repaired. It can be salvaged for parts, however.



Post a Comment

I saw Eternity the other night,
Like a great ring of pure and endless light
-- Henry Vaughan